• The Amazon River cuts its way through Peruvian rain forest.

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  • Victoria amazonica, the giant Amazon water lily. It can grow leaves nine feet in diameter. 

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  • Scarlet macaws preen.

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  • Look closely at the riverside rain forest. Life is hidden in every nook and cranny.

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The Peruvian Amazon. 2 Journeys.

Welcome to the Peruvian Amazon. We explore the Amazonian basin aboard the eight-passenger Delfin I, a lovely river boat built specifically for these waters. R. Crusoe offers two slightly different journeys. On both, overnight in Lima, fly to Iquitos, then explore the river's highlights, among them remarkable Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve.

     The Amazon's sweeping proportions mimic those of an ocean. The river winds through South America’s heart of darkness, shaping the lives of isolated rain forest tribes. Along the river, we catch glimpses of life as it peeks through the verdant walls of jungle ferns and bromeliads along the shores. We penetrate the banks for a firsthand look at rarely seen, giant water lilies in bloom.

     Imagine coming face to face with pink dolphins and prehistoric birds. Can you?


Peru

Type:Custom Journeys/Rivers & Rails

Mode:Water

Journeys

R. Crusoe & Son invites you two wonderful journeys—one is seven days, the other is six—in Peru’s Amazonian Basin. We cruise aboard the eight-passenger, renovated Delfin I, a ship built specifically for these waters. Both journeys run throughout the year. Please note: The rainy season in the Amazon Basin is from December to April; the dry season is May through November. The region is navigable during both the dry and rwet seasons, and each has its merits.

During the Amazon portion of these journeys, R. Crusoe & Son partners with Delfin Amazon Cruises. Unless you are chartering the river boat, you share the Delfin I with other, non-Crusoe travelers.

The Amazon. World's Most Powerful River. Up Close & Personal. Aboard the Delfin I. 7 Days.

Day 1: United States; Lima, Peru
• Fly to Lima.
Overnight in Lima
 
Day 2: Lima, Iquitos, Nauta
• Lima city tour including Plaza Mayor, Palacio de Gobierno, cathedral, Iglesia de San Francisco, Casa de Aliaga.
• Fly to Iquitos, drive to Nauta, embark ship, begin cruising.
Overnight aboard Delfin I

Day 3: Fundo Casual, Yanayuca River, Pucate river, Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve
• Jungle walk along Fundo Casual trail.
• Cruise Yanayuca and Pucate rivers in Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve.
• Option to swim and paddle board with pink dolphins.
Overnight aboard Delfin I

Day 4: Tahuampa Lake, Amazon Park, Nauta Caño Creek
• Paddle Tahuampa Lake to see arapaima.
• Amazon Park canopy walk.
• Cruise upstream toward head of the Amazon.
• Pirañha fishing (catch and release) in skiffs.
• Night safari in skiffs to view nocturnal animals.
Overnight aboard Delfin I

Day 5: Yarapa River, Piraña Caño Creek
• Yarapa River by kayaks for wildlife viewing.
• Cruise Piraña Caño Creek for monkey and bird viewing.
Overnight aboard Delfin I

Day 6: San Francisco, Nauta, ACOBIA, Iquitos, Lima
• Skiffs to San Francisco, meet locals, enter village homes and school, visit market.
• Aboard ship, cruise to Nauta, disembark.
• ACOBIA manatee rescue center.
• Drive to Iquitos, fly to Lima, fly home.
Overnight in flight

Day 7: United States
• Welcome home.

The Amazon. One Mighty River. Aboard the Delfin I. 6 Days.

Day 1: United States; Lima, Peru
• Fly to Lima.
Overnight in Lima

Day 2: Lima, Iquitos, Nauta
• Lima city tour including Plaza Mayor, Palacio de Gobierno, cathedral, Iglesia de San Francisco, Casa de Aliaga.
• Fly to Iquitos, drive to Nauta, embark ship, begin cruising.
Overnight aboard Delfin I

Day 3: Fundo Casual, Yanayacu River, Pucate River, Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve
• Enter Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve, early-morning wildlife viewing.
• Ride skiffs along Yanayuca and Pucate rivers, wildlife viewing.
• Option to swim or paddle-board with pink dolphins.
Overnight aboard Delfin I

Day 4: Amazon Park, San Jacinto Lake or Nauta Caño
• Canopy walk in Amazon Park, canoe San Jacinto Lake.
• Or cruise Nauta Caño, pirañha viewing and fishing (catch and release).
• Night safari in skiffs to view nocturnal animals.
Overnight aboard Delfin I

Day 5: San Francisco, Nauta, ACOBIA, Iquitos, Lima
• San Francisco village visit including homes, school, and market.
• Cruise to Nauta, disembark.
• ACOBIA manatee rescue center.
• Drive to Iquitos, fly to Lima, fly home.
Overnight in flight

Day 6: United States
• Welcome home.

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Pricing

7-day journey: Per person sharing cabin from $5,180.

6-day journey: Per person sharing cabin from $4,290.

Internal air per person (estimate): $420

For more information, to book, or to speak to an R. Crusoe & Son travel specialist, please call us at 800-585-8555.

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About Our Ship.

The eight-passenger Delfin I, built in 1978, has been refurbished. She is 67 feet long and has a 33-foot beam. Her cruising speed averages eight knots. She carries with her two skiffs that are in radio communication with the Delfin I.

     Two Deluxe Master Suites of 360 square feet each are equipped with a king bed (or two twins), panoramic windows, bathroom, minibar, seating area with a sofa bed, air conditioning, safe, and a large private deck with private whirlpool.

     The two Master Suites have the same features except there are no private whirlpools on the decks.

     The Delfin I also has a dining room, observation deck, lounge, and bar.

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Meet the pink river dolphin.

It’s the year 1817. Imagine that you’re floating down the Amazon in the company of French zoologist and anatomist Henri Marie Ducrotay de Blainville, and you see something large and, well, pink, poke up out of the water.

     Perhaps it the wine just now going to your head? The heat, maybe, causing a hallucination? But what you’re seeing is not a pink elephant, not a pink panther. No, you’ve actually spotted a pink river dolphin, Inia geoffrensis, a native denizen of the mighty Amazon River.

     Two hundred years later, the pink dolphin—also known as the boto—still thrives in these waters. They are one of only five freshwater dolphin species on the planet.

     Botos are quite unique, most specifically for their coloring, which ranges from light grey to vivid (unmistakable) pink. These are the largest of the river dolphin species, the males reaching lengths of more than eight feet and weights that exceed 400 pounds (the females are noticeably smaller). Their bodies are robust but flexible because, unlike oceanic dolphins, their cervical vertebrae are not fused, so they can turn their heads a full 90 degrees. That, along with their extra-long fins, allow these pink beauties to maneuver easily not only in deep and shallow river waters, but also in flooded forests.

     Pink dolphins look different from those you’ve seen in saltwater. Pinks have long, needle-nosed snouts with nearly 30 pairs of teeth, conical in the front for grabbing prey and ridged toward the back for crushing. Their eyes are small but functional, and like many other toothed-whale species, their heads are crowned with so-called “melons,” organs used for echolocation (very handy in murky river water).

     Pink dolphins tend to lead solitary lives outside breeding season, but you can occasionally spot pods of four or moere individuals swimming together in the Amazon.

     Though scientists don’t know how many pink dolphins currently exist in the wild, they do know that the species lives in six countries through which the Amazon flows: Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela, a region of about 2.7 million square miles. Within the Amazon Basin, they inhabit only in the river itself, but also canals, tributaries, lakes, and the end of rapids and waterfalls. During the rainy season, they are even seen in flooded forests and floodplains.

     According to traditional Amazon folklore, at night a male river dolphin morphs into a handsome young man who seduces girls, impregnates them, and then returns to the river as a dolphin. Similarly, a female dolphin comes ashore as a wealthy, beautiful young woman who places a married man under a spell and seduces him. On the seventh night of visiting, she transfers a baby into his wife’s womb. This dolphin shapeshifter is called an encantado. The myth, it has been suggested, serves as a way of hiding incestuous relations, which can be quite common in small, isolated communities along the river.

 

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